HORN SYSTEMS

 

Just some photos of the last two horn systems I built in the late 70's. This one was built for a friend who could have purchased the real thing. So, needless to say, I was quite honoured at his decision and that was payment enough. He did absorb the cost of the materials. Ironically enough, the 'cream of the crop' woofers (baskets only) came from Great America Sound in San Antonio, which, years later I discovered was purchased by none other than Klipsch & Associates. The voice coils were special wound by a company in Chicago who also supplied the diaphragms, spiders etc.
This system, although resemblant of the Belle Klipsch ®, is considerably larger and unloads (low frequency cutoff) around 38 Hz. The midrange driver and tweeter, both horns, are Electro Voice. The efficiency is nothing less than awesome; 2 to 3 watts producing an ear shattering 106 db and the kick drum of a rock drummer like Mick Fleetwood will vibrate the legs of your trousers.

 

 

 

 

Now this one is 'la pièce de resistance'. The venerable Klipschorn®. Well, 'tis but a copy. My principles won't allow me to refer to these 'erzatz' creations as Klipschorns. They're also taller than the real thing by about a foot, which may not appear to be much but the width and depth are also larger. It barely fits thru a doorway - sideways. This behemoth will get you down to 34 Hz, flat, at 104 db with one widdow watt. I once drove these things to about 110 db with an IC chip measuring an inch long by 1/4 inch wide. An 8 watt amp on a chip, powered by a 9 volt battery. A squiggle tube (oscilloscope) measured the output assuming an 8 ohm load. The peaks were less than 10 watts. The woofer is a JBL 2205, the squawker is an EV as is the tweeter, but in this case it's a T-350 in lieu of a T-35.

 

 

 

 

These fellas don't lend themselves to easy construction. There are more weird shaped pieces with compound angles that defy calculation, so some of the pieces were cut several times from a scrap piece until they fit. The angles were then carefully measured and noted. The 'scrap' pieces were used as tools to set the angle of the saw blade.

The squawker (midrange) horn is made from plywood, which was no easy task. It's about 24 inches long and maintains an eponential flare of rectangular cross section.

The throat is also rectangular which demanded some creative thinking to couple it to a circular mouth of the driver, and maintain an exponential flare, which I was told, by Mr. Klipsch himself,  was unnecessary but I did it anyway. A wood piece was sanded to replicate the rectangular to circular transition within the design parameters. This piece, then, was used as the center of a plaster mould and after setting, removed. Voila. The plaster piece was encased in a wood adapter and the horn and driver mounted. It works.

Years later I was to discover that JBL made similar adapters for their drivers and horns that could easily have been used.

 

 

 

AN INDEX OF THE KLIPSCH PUBLICATIONS IN MY LIBRARY

 

DOPE FROM HOPE

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON AUDIO

AN INDEX OF THE PAPERS TO WHICH MR. KLIPSCH MADE REFERENCE IN THE FOOTNOTES ON THE PAPERS IN THE BIBLIOGRAPHY ON AUDIO

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